How to Feel About Gaming After GamerGate

How to Feel About Gaming After GamerGate

This week is a weird anniversary for me. It was a year ago that I found myself specifically targeted by GamerGate. I’d been through several minor waves of harassment by them before because of critical coverage of the movement since it started, but being a straight white guy and a pretty minor figure all around it wasn’t that bad. But then, Breitbart tech editor and alt-right media darling Milo Yiannopoulos decided to try and destroy the life of one of their most effective documenters of harassment, I got mixed up in it, and the next thing I know I have to bring Harris County Sheriff’s Office out to my house to try and prevent a possible SWATing. If you need the details, they’re here.

 gamer-1603101812063539.jpg (1240×800)

I’m not really here to talk about GamerGate, though. As a cultural phenomenon it’s largely over, though the mainstreaming of harassment, doxing and other online terrorism that is its legacy is ongoing for the forseeable future. I want to talk about gaming as I knew it before GamerGate, and gaming as I know it now.

Before 2012 my viewpoint on games was uncomplicated. I was a media critic, but fairly unversed in looking at the world through any other lens beyond the one I was born with. My thoughts on bad behavior in the game space amounted to “don’t play shooters on multiplayer because teenage boys will call you names.” Basically, I gamed like I lived inside Twisted Destiny’s, “Let’s Play.”


Related Articles

Big discounts on the Green Man Gaming Summer Sale, Doom markdowns, and extra sport offers

Steam, Microsoft, GameStop and the PlayStation Store already had their massive summer season income and now it’s Green Man Gaming’s

This week’s highs and lows in PC gaming

This week I interviewed ex-NFL linebacker-became-Hollywood actor-grew to become-PC gaming fanatic Terry Crews. Despite this being quite thrilling in and

Are we geared up for a telephone for hardcore game enthusiasts?

The gaming phone has had turbulent records. Be it with the Nokia N-Gage, the Acer Predator 6, or the Sony